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If you were to look at business leaders’ top priorities for 2018, I’m sure you’d see plenty of variations of “maximize ROI” or “increase revenue.” There’s nothing wrong with that, of course, it’s just that businesses are often so focused on results from their marketing efforts that many things are often overlooked in the haste to get quick wins and better ROI. There’s supposed to be a 360° approach to inbound marketing, and design is a big part of that.

The Importance of Design in Marketing

Not only does design help attract attention towards your marketing, it can also enhance the quality of your message. For more specific instances of how design influences your marketing, look no further than the examples below.

Establishes Brand Identity, Look, and Feel

When you think of the world’s most well known brands, you can instantly picture their logos, unique color schemes, and even fonts. This isn’t something these brands luckily stumbled upon; a lot goes into developing the ideal logo, finding the perfect color scheme, and making the right font choices. Psychological studies have been conducted to see how people perceive different colors, and marketers use that in their branding to help convey quality or a different message. Certain colors can create excitement or sadness, increase appetite, or even create a feeling of warmth or coolness. If you want to convey your product/service is high-end, for example, brands will often use colors like black, gold, or silver. 

Logo Examples.png

In addition to the color scheme, a lot of work goes into developing the perfect font for your design. Selecting the proper typefaces, size, and style is crucial for developing your brand identity, and everything about the font is closely considered from a designer standpoint, like weight, kerning, leading, point size, feeling/style, etc. The fonts you use are a reflection of your company, much like the clothes you wear to an important sales meeting. Some fonts are more comparable to suits, while others are more comparable to pajamas.

Font Exmaples.png

Raises the Visibility of Your Campaigns

With so many companies competing for attention online these days, having exceptional design is one of the best ways to differentiate yourself from the crowd. Likewise, if your design just stinks altogether, you really have no chance of being noticed. As humans, it’s in our nature to habituate our environments and become familiar with things that don’t stand out. If people noticed every detail of every little thing, there’d be information overload. For designers, it’s important to visualize your marketing the way your target persona sees it, so you can better determine what would help it stand out, and stay away from designs that make it unappealing to them.

Visual Ad Exmaples.png

Getting your target persona’s attention is just one part of the equation, however. Once you have your persona’s attention, you now need to keep their attention, and good design helps you do that. Have you ever seen a targeted ad on Facebook, for example? Have you clicked on it? If the art direction looks good and the topic is relevant to me, not only will it catch my attention, but I’m also much more likely to click. When the photo, design, or topic is irrelevant to me or features an uninteresting picture, however, then I’m much more likely to keep scrolling.

Drives Conversion and Ultimately ROI

Great design can do a lot to help improve your marketing efforts, and it does more than just help your content stand out and look good. Using the right design can help influence more conversions, and ultimately improve your ROI. It’s been proven that photos of people can help increase empathy, for example, as researchers have found that people feel a deeper connection to images with other people than those without. Photos of women, babies, and attractive people have also been proven to increase visual response rates (sorry regular people!), and photos of objects can also help increase trust (e.g., detailed product images). When combined with conversion opportunities, relevant, well-placed photos like the ones above can help increase conversions on your offers, and eventually more customers.

4 Insider Tips for Better Design

Before you get started jumping into new design goals for your company, there are some things you should know that can help you get the most from your investment. From our own design experience, here are four design tips that can help you achieve better results.

1. Good Design Takes Time

If there’s one thing you take away from the notes above, it’s that good design decisions aren’t just made by chance; they’re made after hours of intensive research and careful planning by your design team. There’s a lot more to the design process than just making a logo and trying different variations until you have one you like. For designers, there’s a lot of planning and research work that is done beforehand, including familiarizing themselves with the brand, customer and prospect interviews, and studying a brand’s SEO strategy and content.

2. With Design, You Get What You Pay For

If you’re looking to give your website or brand a complete makeover, investing in a good designer is always worth the extra cost. An experienced designer will help eliminate a lot of the guesswork involved with design, and will dig right into your brand and personas to develop the best options. Whether you invest in training or hiring a designer internally, or hire a freelance designer or agency, there are plenty of opportunities and services to hire a properly trained designer today that will actually help you achieve the results you’re looking for. Design isn’t just something anyone can do, just like accounting isn’t something everyone can do, even if they have the proper programs for it.

3. It’s Not Always About Looks

Yes, a lot of design choices are based on their aesthetics. However, as Steve Jobs said, “design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.” When designing a website, for example, the first thing, and most important, thing you design for is user experience. Looks are secondary. There are plenty examples of websites that look incredible, but are confusing to navigate. A good designer makes the design work around the content of the website, and helps that content stand out, which helps your personas move smoothly through your site on their search for information.

4. Focus on Your Target Audience

Speaking of personas, your target audience should be your primary design inspiration. When they visit your site, you want to be thinking how it looks and feels in terms of style, and how they might navigate and interact with your site from different landing points (blog, homepage, landing pages, etc.). You want to use imagery, color, and fonts that are appealing to them and support your brand’s message.

Our Content Creation Templates can help you jumpstart some design improvements for content, but please contact us if you have any questions about how Weidert Group can help with your design needs

 

Posted by Justin Harrison

Ref:https://www.weidert.com/whole_brain_marketing_blog/importance-of-design


read more Posted by kwizera Innocent 25th Oct 2018


Technology has made this world a synchronized global village. In this fast -changing world of technology, the pace of evolution is especially quick when it comes to field of software development. Out of all fields of information technology, software development is the most dynamic and advancing. Today many software development companies in the industry are striving to keep them up to date in the market in order to make survival possible. Programming Technologies With the world of technology accelerating at a great speed, a number of popular programming technologies might go obsolete within the coming few years. The arena of software development services will not be an exception to this upheaval of current technologies and methodologies. All these programming methodologies will be now overshadowed by newer trends which deliver faster development and wider capabilities. The change in these programming trends is driven by various factors including increased customisation, better efficiency and ease of use. Here are the top programming trends of 2018 likely to be followed by the mobile app developers in order to use the multiple technologies, which gives them the quick and easy solutions in building a software. Sneak of Java: Java is the most popular programming language of present times for many mobile app development companies though it has been tweaked a lot over the past fifteen years to smoother it out as well as improve its efficiency. Being a most deployed software for developing native Android applications, Java is setting its own trend that might continue this year as well. It not only provides unmatched readability and simplicity but also keeps the legacy Java applications functional and more efficient to the users as well as for developers. Increased Usage of PHP: PHP- a most popular tool in the world of web development as an open source web programming language, is gaining a strong hold in the domain of website development. PHP is the most used and most important tool for web development industry. It has become so common to use PHP as a web developing tool that you will find it almost anywhere in this busy internet world. This trending programming language in 2018 has been used extensively by the mobile app developers for developing a large number of websites. Emergence of Dockers: Dockers- an open source tool, is mostly used by the mobile app developers. Dockers is nothing but a container, which is used to run your applications anywhere after development. It enables virtualization for building and shipping software applications. Now it is becoming a prime trend of programming, because of its small size, better functionality and effective deployment. Ruby on the rails programming: Ruby on Rails Technology is an emerging and most widely used technology in the web development world with its tremendous surge in the coming years. It is actually an OOP or object-oriented programming language, which is similar to the Perland Python. It is different from other web development frameworks due to its user-friendly and amazing speed, cost effectiveness, customisations and flexible features. Spark: Spark- an upcoming trend in the 2018 IT industry, is widely used for processing both structured and non -structured data. Spark framework is actually a simple Java web framework where developers don't have to know XML and allows very fast and rapid development. Moreover, it is somehow similar to Hadoop and also popular because of its ease of use, simple and straightforward architecture. Android Programming: Android programming is a fast- emerging platform in the technology era and has a really fast rising mobile market. It is an amazing open operating system that invites hardware and software developers to work on it in an absolutely free atmosphere. The openness of the Android operating system enhances the creativity of developers with new trends, technologies and method in the next digital year 2018. Because of its openness of the software, it is easy to modify the programming according to the preferences of the user and the new technologies. Conclusion: All the above-mentioned programming trends are about to rule the software development world in the upcoming year of 21st century. Now enhance and drive your business operation even more effectively and efficiently by coping with these programming trends. By Sarah Maxwell Ref:https://www.google.be/amp/s/yourstory.com/mystory/7634d6bd56-latest-programming-tec/amp

read more Posted by kwizera Innocent 23rd Oct 2018


Facebook is releasing a redesigned version of Messenger today that attempts to put the focus back on your chats. After years of revenue-focused expansion into bots, games, payments, and other distractions, the company is bringing Messenger back to basics. While all those extra widgets are still present in the app, they’ve mostly been hidden away in spots where you can safely ignore them. The new Messenger still promotes its business objectives throughout the app, but on the whole it’s a welcome return to a time when the app was first and foremost a lightweight utility.

“Messenger is really powerful,” says David Breger, a product manager on the app. “But if you look at something like this, I don’t know if the first word you would use is ‘simple.’” Breger is talking about the old version of the app, which ballooned over the past half-decade into nine different tabs.

It’s worth talking, briefly, about just how complex Messenger had become. There were tabs for games, for people, and for businesses. There were tabs for your friends who currently had the app open, for your groups, and for your past calls. The button for starting a new text message had become a tiny square next to the search bar, while the most prominent real estate was reserved for a button to take photos and videos.

Messenger had a version of ephemeral stories called Day, which it bolted on top of your chats. Every time you shared a private photo, Messenger suggested that you to post it publicly. (I did so multiple times — on accident.) Day was eventually killed off in favor of cross-posted Facebook stories, but the bad taste lingered.

Messenger was born as a simple way for Facebook users to send messages to one another while they browsed it on the desktop. But in 2014 it spun Messenger out on its own as a mobile app, bringing on former PayPal president David Marcus to run it. Facebook executives took notice of the outsized success that China’s WeChat had in becoming a digital wallet and identity system, and set about trying to mimic it.

“We’ve built a lot of capabilities over the years, but [Messenger] is not as simple as the app was when we first began our journey,” said Stan Chudnovsky, who took over Messenger earlier this year when Marcus went to run Facebook’s new blockchain division. “We had a decision to make here: we can continue to pile on, or we can build a new foundation that would really enable us to build simplicity and powerful features on top of something that’s new and something that goes back to its roots.”

I’m sympathetic to the challenges faced by the Messenger team. Their goal is to build a large business around the commoditized (and expensive to run) world of messaging apps. It’s a difficult thing to do — ask Snap. Moreover, while users may complain generally about Messenger’s feature bloat, the app is used by more than 1.3 billion people a month. At that scale, every feature is used by many millions of people. That makes it extremely difficult to axe features altogether.

But something had to be done. When Facebook surveyed its users recently, 70 percent told the company that the most important quality of a good messaging app is its simplicity. With that in mind, Facebook went back to the drawing board — and where it couldn’t eliminate features outright, it tried to consolidate them.

The new Messenger, which Facebook previewed in May at its developer conference, consolidates what once occupied nine tabs into three. It still feels mostly familiar. The app opens to your chats, just as before. The design makes slightly greater use of white space, though you can still see the same number of chats on a single screen (six). The big photo / video button on the bottom is gone; it has been replaced by a smaller camera icon next to the icon for sending a new text message.

The central tab is called “people,” and it serves as a phone book. People who are actively using Messenger at the same time as you will show up first in the contacts list, and next to their name is a hand emoji that, if you tap it, will send your friend a casual “wave.” One thing that has remained consistent between old Messenger and new is that it is always trying to get you to start new conversations with friends, and hence use the app more. That’s the only explanation I can give for the numbered badge on the people tab that tells you how many of your friends are active at any given time. I don’t know what I’m supposed to do with the information that 77 of my friends are also looking at Messenger right now, but now I know. (You can hide your active status from friends if you want, which will also make the badge go away.)

One of the more confounding things about the new Messenger is that it shows you Facebook stories twice: once above your chats, where they’re mixed in with pictures of your friends who are active on Messenger, and then again in the people tab, where they sit in a row on top of your phone book. In a redesign that started from the principle of simplicity, the redundancy around stories feels hard to justify. (Facebook says it initially removed stories from the people tab, but the test group demanded that they return. Thanks for nothing, test group!)

The final tab is called “discover,” and it’s where you’ll find businesses and games in a section labeled “for you.” In theory these are personalized, but in practice I have found them irrelevant. My top suggestion is a business that invites me to “Discover the secret to learning English” — a rather harsh critique of my work. There are also insurance companies, cleaning services, games, and a variety of bots that you can invite to interrupt you throughout the day with news, sports scores, horoscopes, and other information. Within the discover tab there’s a secondary tab called “businesses” that features a directory of brands.

Along with consolidating tabs, the Messenger team made a handful of tweaks to individual chats. You can now change the color of a chat to be a gradient, so that the color changes as you scroll up and down. It looks great. You can also give anyone in any chat a nickname now, which is useful for trolling purposes. And there’s a nice new gesture for starting phone calls and video chats: just swipe right on a person’s name, and the relevant icons are revealed. In the coming months, Messenger also plans to add a sharp-looking dark mode.

Of course, the chats themselves are still laden with features. Every chat gives you the option to send text, an emoji, stickers, a voice memo, a photo, or a video. Tap the new four-dot icon and you’ll see everything else that has accumulated in what I think of as Messenger’s junk drawer: location sharing, games, GIFs, bots, and reminders. (Who is using Messenger as their reminder app, exactly?)

I spent the past week using the redesigned Messenger, and I’m a fan of its pared-down look and feel. My favorite era of Messenger arrived just after it spun out of Facebook’s flagship app, when it was basically just a texting app with a growing roster of cute stickers. The redesign takes it back in that direction, marking a rare case when a company retreats from its greater ambitions to focus on customer satisfaction. In practice, the new Messenger isn’t really faster so much as it is streamlined. There’s less of what you don’t want, and more of what you do. It’s a welcome change of pace.

Nick Statt contributed to this report.

Reference: https://www.theverge.com/2018/10/23/18009004/facebook-messenger-redesign-simplicity

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Facebook is releasing a redesigned version of Messenger today that attempts to put the focus back on your chats. After years of revenue-focused expansion into bots, games, payments, and other distractions, the company is bringing Messenger back to basics. While all those extra widgets are still present in the app, they’ve mostly been hidden away in spots where you can safely ignore them. The new Messenger still promotes its business objectives throughout the app, but on the whole it’s a welcome return to a time when the app was first and foremost a lightweight utility.

“Messenger is really powerful,” says David Breger, a product manager on the app. “But if you look at something like this, I don’t know if the first word you would use is ‘simple.’” Breger is talking about the old version of the app, which ballooned over the past half-decade into nine different tabs.

It’s worth talking, briefly, about just how complex Messenger had become. There were tabs for games, for people, and for businesses. There were tabs for your friends who currently had the app open, for your groups, and for your past calls. The button for starting a new text message had become a tiny square next to the search bar, while the most prominent real estate was reserved for a button to take photos and videos.

Messenger had a version of ephemeral stories called Day, which it bolted on top of your chats. Every time you shared a private photo, Messenger suggested that you to post it publicly. (I did so multiple times — on accident.) Day was eventually killed off in favor of cross-posted Facebook stories, but the bad taste lingered.

Messenger was born as a simple way for Facebook users to send messages to one another while they browsed it on the desktop. But in 2014 it spun Messenger out on its own as a mobile app, bringing on former PayPal president David Marcus to run it. Facebook executives took notice of the outsized success that China’s WeChat had in becoming a digital wallet and identity system, and set about trying to mimic it.

“We’ve built a lot of capabilities over the years, but [Messenger] is not as simple as the app was when we first began our journey,” said Stan Chudnovsky, who took over Messenger earlier this year when Marcus went to run Facebook’s new blockchain division. “We had a decision to make here: we can continue to pile on, or we can build a new foundation that would really enable us to build simplicity and powerful features on top of something that’s new and something that goes back to its roots.”

I’m sympathetic to the challenges faced by the Messenger team. Their goal is to build a large business around the commoditized (and expensive to run) world of messaging apps. It’s a difficult thing to do — ask Snap. Moreover, while users may complain generally about Messenger’s feature bloat, the app is used by more than 1.3 billion people a month. At that scale, every feature is used by many millions of people. That makes it extremely difficult to axe features altogether.

But something had to be done. When Facebook surveyed its users recently, 70 percent told the company that the most important quality of a good messaging app is its simplicity. With that in mind, Facebook went back to the drawing board — and where it couldn’t eliminate features outright, it tried to consolidate them.

The new Messenger, which Facebook previewed in May at its developer conference, consolidates what once occupied nine tabs into three. It still feels mostly familiar. The app opens to your chats, just as before. The design makes slightly greater use of white space, though you can still see the same number of chats on a single screen (six). The big photo / video button on the bottom is gone; it has been replaced by a smaller camera icon next to the icon for sending a new text message.

The central tab is called “people,” and it serves as a phone book. People who are actively using Messenger at the same time as you will show up first in the contacts list, and next to their name is a hand emoji that, if you tap it, will send your friend a casual “wave.” One thing that has remained consistent between old Messenger and new is that it is always trying to get you to start new conversations with friends, and hence use the app more. That’s the only explanation I can give for the numbered badge on the people tab that tells you how many of your friends are active at any given time. I don’t know what I’m supposed to do with the information that 77 of my friends are also looking at Messenger right now, but now I know. (You can hide your active status from friends if you want, which will also make the badge go away.)

One of the more confounding things about the new Messenger is that it shows you Facebook stories twice: once above your chats, where they’re mixed in with pictures of your friends who are active on Messenger, and then again in the people tab, where they sit in a row on top of your phone book. In a redesign that started from the principle of simplicity, the redundancy around stories feels hard to justify. (Facebook says it initially removed stories from the people tab, but the test group demanded that they return. Thanks for nothing, test group!)

The final tab is called “discover,” and it’s where you’ll find businesses and games in a section labeled “for you.” In theory these are personalized, but in practice I have found them irrelevant. My top suggestion is a business that invites me to “Discover the secret to learning English” — a rather harsh critique of my work. There are also insurance companies, cleaning services, games, and a variety of bots that you can invite to interrupt you throughout the day with news, sports scores, horoscopes, and other information. Within the discover tab there’s a secondary tab called “businesses” that features a directory of brands.

Along with consolidating tabs, the Messenger team made a handful of tweaks to individual chats. You can now change the color of a chat to be a gradient, so that the color changes as you scroll up and down. It looks great. You can also give anyone in any chat a nickname now, which is useful for trolling purposes. And there’s a nice new gesture for starting phone calls and video chats: just swipe right on a person’s name, and the relevant icons are revealed. In the coming months, Messenger also plans to add a sharp-looking dark mode.

Of course, the chats themselves are still laden with features. Every chat gives you the option to send text, an emoji, stickers, a voice memo, a photo, or a video. Tap the new four-dot icon and you’ll see everything else that has accumulated in what I think of as Messenger’s junk drawer: location sharing, games, GIFs, bots, and reminders. (Who is using Messenger as their reminder app, exactly?)

I spent the past week using the redesigned Messenger, and I’m a fan of its pared-down look and feel. My favorite era of Messenger arrived just after it spun out of Facebook’s flagship app, when it was basically just a texting app with a growing roster of cute stickers. The redesign takes it back in that direction, marking a rare case when a company retreats from its greater ambitions to focus on customer satisfaction. In practice, the new Messenger isn’t really faster so much as it is streamlined. There’s less of what you don’t want, and more of what you do. It’s a welcome change of pace.

Nick Statt contributed to this report.

Reference: https://www.theverge.com/2018/10/23/18009004/facebook-messenger-redesign-simplicity


read more Posted by kwizera Innocent 23rd Oct 2018


The main purpose of media is to disseminate the information and knowledge. Media is the best medium of communication for mass audience. With the help of various media like electronic media, print media and web media, we at xaecia media can shape opinions. Welcome to xaecia media.


read more Posted by kwizera Innocent 02nd Oct 2018


Progressive Web Apps is actually a collection of technologies, Web APIs and a host of design concepts that work in conjunction with one another to provide an amazing experience to the user.

It brings forth the features in native apps through Web based technologies within a secure container that can be accessed anywhere, anytime. In fact, Progressive Web Apps bridges the gap between websites and native mobile apps, and offers a host of benefits like:

1. Offline access

Regular websites stop working when the internet connection is cut off, but PWA uses caching to continue working offline. You will not be faced with the typical 404 error page. The offline functionality of PWAs generates engagement and availability; especially for ecommerce websites.

In the absence of internet connection, a user can even access a page that he hasn’t previously visited in his device. Instead of the error screen, a custom offline page with the company’s brand name, logo, and certain other information will be displayed. The overall benefit is that the user will continue accessing the site irrespective of the internet connection. 

2. Faster loading time

Progressive web apps loads instantly for both regular and first-time customers. If done correctly, users can enjoy a loading time that’s 3 times faster than what they are experiencing now.

3. App like feel

Though PWA is a regular website, it generates an app-like feel because the app shell model separates the functionality part from the content part. In other words, PWA is engaging because it behaves like an app on the user’s device and provides an impressive user experience. This could be because it is fast, and highly responsive, with absolutely no loading time.

4. No app store submissions

Progressive web apps can be downloaded and used as it is, without the requirement of any app store submissions. This reduces TTM (Time to Market) considerably because getting the permissions from each app store is a painstaking process as the developers have to follow the rules and guidelines of each of the store before they are published.

 

Reference: https://www.cabotsolutions.com/2017/10/developing-progressive-web-apps-in-ionic-framework


read more Posted by kwizera Innocent 15th Mar 2018


Ionic Framework is a complete open-source SDK for hybrid mobile app development. Built on top of Angular.js and Apache Cordova, Ionic provides tools and services for developing hybrid mobile apps using Web technologies like CSS, HTML5, and Sass. Apps can be built with these Web technologies and then distributed through native app stores to be installed on devices by leveraging Cordova.

Ionic Framework is a 100% free and open source project, licensed under MIT. It will always remain free to use, powered by a massive worldwide community. They have over 120 native device features like Bluetooth, HealthKit, Finger Print Auth, and more with Cordova/PhoneGap plugins and TypeScript extensions. You can use their CLI to create, build, test, and deploy your Ionic apps onto any platform. The framework has Ionicons icon pack with hundreds of the most common app icons. MIT licensed, and ready out of the box. And you can develop your apps by Live Reload because to compile and redeploy your app at every step of development is for chumps. And there are more useful features like deep linking, AoT Compiling, Ionic Native.

Jscrambler has a comprehensive tutorial on how to protect your Ionic mobile hybrid app. If you are interested in security, you may want to take a look at it here!

Ionic Framework is a complete open-source SDK for hybrid mobile app development. Built on top of Angular.js and Apache Cordova, Ionic provides tools and services for developing hybrid mobile apps using Web technologies like CSS, HTML5, and Sass. Apps can be built with these Web technologies and then distributed through native app stores to be installed on devices by leveraging Cordova.

Ionic Framework is a 100% free and open source project, licensed under MIT. It will always remain free to use, powered by a massive worldwide community. They have over 120 native device features like Bluetooth, HealthKit, Finger Print Auth, and more with Cordova/PhoneGap plugins and TypeScript extensions. You can use their CLI to create, build, test, and deploy your Ionic apps onto any platform. The framework has Ionicons icon pack with hundreds of the most common app icons. MIT licensed, and ready out of the box. And you can develop your apps by Live Reload because to compile and redeploy your app at every step of development is for chumps. And there are more useful features like deep linking, AoT Compiling, Ionic Native.

Jscrambler has a comprehensive tutorial on how to protect your Ionic mobile hybrid app. If you are interested in security, you may want to take a look at it here!


read more Posted by kwizera Innocent 01st Mar 2018


 

Once the kings of the industry, these former glories still struggle to impress us a year after their return.

Last February, the once-great Nokia and BlackBerry brands each hoped to stage a triumphant return at the world's largest phone show.  

A year on, we're still waiting for a knockout device that will put either one back in the international spotlight in a meaningful way. Despite the brands launching eight Android phones between them in the past year, it's clear neither one has turned the tide.

Neither company can expect to return to their pre-2010 heights, before the phone world accelerated its path to its current iPhone-Android duopoly. But if their respective comebacks fall flat, it means fewer choices for consumers in an era increasingly dominated by Apple and Samsung handsets.

Fewer than 6 million Nokia phones shipped in the past year, IHS Markit analyst Wayne Lam told CNET, adding that his firm deems 10 million shipments as significant. BlackBerry Mobile could have shipped as many as 170,000 units in the fourth quarter, according to Neil Shah, an analyst at Counterpoint Research. In contrast, Apple sold 77.3 million iPhones in a single quarter

BlackBerry Mobile (as opposed to BlackBerry Limited, which doesn't manage the phone arm) declined to share sales figures and HMD Global, which licenses Nokia's name, didn't respond to multiple requests to comment on this story.

Low sales figures are to be expected for these revivalists, even a year in. Comebacks in the phone world don't happen overnight; they occur over years of steady investment and marketing work.

"[With] Nokia and BlackBerry, there's an expectation that they will take the world by storm in just a few months and dominate the market once again," said Francois Mahieu, BlackBerry Mobile's chief commercial officer. "The world knows there are two mega players right now, Apple and Samsung ... it takes time."

Both BlackBerry and Nokia phones are expected to update in the coming months, hoping to kick up momentum once again. The Nokia brand has its announcement this week at Mobile World Congress 2018 and BlackBerry is expected to unveil its next phone later in March, according to analysts.

The hopefuls will need much more than a flashy presentation or booth space to wrest attention from the Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus, which Samsung will unveil on February 25. For BlackBerry and Nokia devices to stand a chance against the Samsung leviathan, they'll need to show top-tier phones with hardware and software good enough to compete.

 


read more Posted by kwizera Innocent 23rd Feb 2018


Simple steps to disable auto windows updates on your windows 10

This is a simple guide for an everyday user to stop this feature that drains your internet bundles.

Step 1: Navigate to your task bar and click on the connections icon at the bottom right.

 

Step 2:  Click on the network you are connected to(This method works separately for each network you get connected to)

 

Step 4: Click on properties of the selected network connection. 

 

Step 5: Check the switch on the set as metered connection (turn it on)

 

Voila!! That’s all it should take to help you with the simple procedure. More guides will be posted for other methods.


read more Posted by kwizera Innocent 22nd Feb 2018


Samsung certainly likes to be the king of Solid State Drives. Just two years after it launched its 15.36TB SAS SSD drive – which then boasted the most memory packed into a 2.5 inch drive – the company has taken its own crown with a brand new 30.72 TB model.

According to Samsung, the drive – catchily named PM1643 – is built from 32 sticks of 1TB NAND flash packages, all containing 16 layers of 512GB 3D Vertical NAND chips. This gives the drive two times the capacity and speed of its predecessor, but allows it to retain its unassuming 2.5-inch frame.  

 

If you want to know how exactly you’ll be able to benefit from this greater storage space, think more than 600 days of non-stop movie watching. 

Good things in small packages

It’s not clear when the PM1643 will go on sale, but Samsung said it started manufacturing initial quantities in January 2018 and has plans to expand the range throughout the year with 15.36TB, 7.68TB, 3.84TB, 1.92TB, 960GB and 800GB versions. 

Don’t expect to be able to see any 30TB SSDs on the consumer market any time soon, but as always there will be an eventual trickle down and we will potentially see some effect on current SSD prices.


read more Posted by kwizera Innocent 21st Feb 2018


ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

 

Over The years AI has raised the dust by bringing up debates about whether its good for our future or not

Undoubtably, AI could have ‘immense’ benefits for us all, we are talking AI used in medicine, self driving cars, robots investigating criminal cases, and eldery care. We also witnessed Airbus recently mention its interests in future pilotless planes.

 

However we need to face the facts here, there are majour concerns such as,..we know the robots are coming, but will they take our jobs?, could AI revolutionise everything? could there be killer robots that would destroy humans?

Perhaps we might know when its late but this revolution much as there could be great benefits, there is a price to pay. As such we should not overlook the fact that these are just machines but ought to be handled with sanity,....otherwise replacing humans would be the least of our worries.


read more Posted by kwizera Innocent 11th Feb 2018